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No need to stress

…we’ll help you regain your hormone balance

A hormonal imbalance in your middle years is completely normal and nothing to be unduly worried about. We understand it, and a safe, simple treatment will resolve it.

No need to stress

…we’ll help you regain your hormone balance

A hormonal imbalance in your middle years is completely normal and nothing to be unduly worried about. We understand it, and a safe, simple treatment will resolve it.

No need to stress

…we’ll help you regain your hormone balance

About time!

“I’ll give you the time to explain your concerns… and take the time to resolve them with a straightforward, personalised treatment.”

Dr Rebecca Poet

About time!

“I’ll give you the time to explain your concerns… and take the time to resolve them with a straightforward, personalised treatment.”

Dr Rebecca Poet

About time!

“I’ll give you the time to explain your concerns… and take the time to resolve them with a straightforward, personalised treatment.”

Dr Rebecca Poet

Hormones

What are they, and how do they affect us?

Modern HRT

Is extremely safe and packed with benefits

All you need to know about fees and associated costs

A simple, clear understanding of how much you should expect to pay

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need a referral from my GP?

No. A referral from your GP is not necessary however it is important that you are registered with an NHS GP and are attending all relevant screening programs. It also is important that you tell your GP about any treatments you are using when you consult with them. We are happy to write to your GP at any stage.

Why am I tired all the time yet struggling to sleep properly?

Extreme tiredness is a common symptom of hormonal imbalance and often one of the most disruptive to life. There are multiple causes and it is typical to have more than one at play. Low levels of hormones such as testosterone lead to fatigue and yet low levels of the soothing hormone progesterone can make it difficult to sleep. Nights that are frequently interrupted by sweats and flushes are not restful and increased levels of anxiety can lead to nights spent laying awake feeling inexplicably worried. Added to this is the emotional exhaustion that many women feel as they pass through this inevitable transition in their lives at a time when demands from work and family are high. This is all common. Correcting hormonal imbalances and addressing lifestyle factors is commonly all that is needed to restore restful sleep and improve energy levels and general well being.

I’ve put on weight that I'm struggling to lose, what can I do about it?

Metabolism changes as our hormone levels fall and this coupled with an increase in fatigue and reduction in stamina make weight gain more likely. Blood sugars need to be balanced with a Low GI diet and it is important to eat enough essential fats to allow hormone production by the body. With treatment, as energy levels improve, the thought of exercising can be less overwhelming and this forms an important part of restoring normal weight levels.

Am I in the menopause?

If you are experiencing symptoms such as hot flushes, night sweats or your periods are becoming more erratic or heavier then you may well be experiencing the effects of hormonal change associated with the perimenopause. Refer to our symptom checker to learn more. If you are over 50 and have not had a period for a year, or under 50 and have not had a period for 2 years then you can be considered menopausal.

How is menopause confirmed?

Menopause is defined as the point at which you have not had a period for 2 years If you are under the age of 50, or 1 year if you are over 50.

I'm too young for the menopause, could I still have a hormonal imbalance?

The short answer is yes. From the time we are born (long before the menopause), our hormones dictate our appetite, sleep patterns, how we respond to stress, our libido, whether we are happy or anxious and everything in between. They are all finely tuned to work together and disruptions to this balance commonly occur at times of significant stress, if we change how we are eating or exercising, or during major physical changes such as during or after an illness or pregnancy. Sometimes these changes are temporary and correct themselves but at other times they are more persistent and need some assistance until you are back on track. Please refer to our symptom checker to see if you are experiencing symptoms which could be due to a hormonal imbalance. 

I’m getting hot flushes, what other symptoms can I expect in the menopause?

Hot flushes are one of the most common symptoms of the perimenopause and menopause although not all women will suffer. Each woman’s experience during this phase of their life will be different, some will have few symptoms and others will have many of those listed below. The important thing to note is that with effective treatment and support these symptoms need not affect your quality of life. See of symptom checker to find out if your symptoms could be due to a hormonal imbalance.

What are the complications of menopause?

Reaching menopause for many women means the end of heavy or painful periods and having no need to worry about falling pregnant unintentionally. This can be a liberating time. There are however some health concerns which become more common as time passes after the menopause. Oestrogen has an important role in slowing down bone loss and protecting us from heart disease. Once our body has stopped producing oestrogen rates of osteoporosis, heart attack and stroke are more common. It is extremely important to maintain a healthy lifestyle after the menopause to reduce these risks but rebalancing your hormones can also play a part.

If I’m in the menopause, will I get osteoporosis?

Oestrogen helps to slow down natural bone loss in women and as levels decline through menopause this protective effect is lost. This does not however mean that all women will develop osteoporosis as there are other factors which come into play such as medical and family history, weight, activity levels and whether you smoke. HRT can slow down this bone loss and improve the body’s absorption of calcium making osteoporosis less likely or less severe.

I’m finding sex painful what can I do about it?

Oestrogen is important for maintaining the health and structure of skin all over the body, including in the vaginal area. As levels fall, vaginal tissue thins and becomes more delicate. It is less good at producing lubrication and this dry delicate skin can make sex uncomfortable. Applying oestrogen cream to the vulva and vagina is a quick and easy way to restore the health of this tissue and to make things back to how they were before. This can be done safely as part of systemic HRT or on its own if these are the only symptoms. It is also important to use a high quality lubricant such as one designed for the post menopausal woman.

My libido has reduced and I find it hard to get aroused, what can I do about it?

Reduction in libido is a very common and frequently distressing symptom and has several possible causes. Changes in self-esteem due to changes in weight and how you feel about this time in your life can have a big impact on libido. Discomfort experienced during sex due to the effect of lower levels of oestrogen on the vaginal area can make sex less appealing. Also low levels of testosterone can commonly mean that sex is the last thing on your mind and that it is difficult to become aroused. These hormonal imbalances are easy to correct and commonly lead to a return of normal sexual functioning. In severe cases, a psychosexual counsellor can help guide you through your problems and if necessary we can refer you to a specialist.

Can I still have an orgasm after menopause?

Yes! It is still possible to have a completely normal sex life for as long as you wish to after the menopause. The skin of the vulva and vagina will inevitably become more thin and delicate as oestrogen levels fall but these can be replaced with a simple local cream which can be used even if you would prefer to avoid general HRT.

How much will medications cost?

Licenced products are available from us on private prescription or alternatively your GP may be happy to take on prescribing. As a guide, 3 months worth of oestrogen patches costs up to £45, a tube of oestrogen gel approximately £7 and Testosterone gel £40 for a tube that will last several months. Specially compounded bioidentical hormones are more expensive than licenced preparations and cost between £1-£3 per day – still less than the price of a cup of coffee.